How a Better Way to Break up Samples Works

Many tissue homogenizers cause bottlenecks in the workflow of a biology laboratory. This is largely due to the common one-tip design, which breaks up samples either by mechanical shearing or sonication.

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Problem: Many tissue homogenizers cause bottlenecks in the workflow of a biology laboratory. This is largely due to the common one-tip design, which breaks up samples either by mechanical shearing or sonication. Since users have to use the tip with one sample at a time, it is slow and cumbersome, often requiring disassembly of the instrument for cleaning in between samples. Not only is this one-by-one technique prone to contamination and excessive heating of the sample, it is inconsistent between samples, very loud, tedious, and causes some of the sample to be lost when the probe is removed.

Additionally, the methods used for different types of cells require different instrumentation which can be expensive and redundant — homogenizers for tissues, sonicators for cells, shredders for plant material, etc.

Solution: It is more consistent, reproducible, and cost-effective to use equipment which can process multiple samples simultaneously. Available from BIOCON Scientific and manufactured in the U.S., the Bullet Blender™ can process up to 24 samples in closed tubes at once. It vigorously strikes sample tubes, transferring the energy to the tissue within. The only thing that touches your sample is what you put in the tube — so cross-contamination is not an issue.

The Bullet Blender™ can be used for disrupting cells, homogenizing tissue, and shredding plant material by simply adjusting the agitation power and the selection of beads in the tubes. This solution from BIOCON Scientific can help save you at least six times what a sonicator would cost you compared to the Bullet Blender™.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: How it Works

Published In

Management's Role in Laboratory Automation Magazine Issue Cover
Management's Role in Laboratory Automation

Published: January 1, 2008

Cover Story