How an Integrated Platform-Based Approach to Proteomics Research Works

The ever-increasing sophistication of today’s laboratory technologies means that scientific researchers must be constantly finding new ways to improve the quality, efficiency, and pace of their research to ensure success.

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Problem: The ever-increasing sophistication of today’s laboratory technologies means that scientific researchers must be constantly finding new ways to improve the quality, efficiency, and pace of their research to ensure success. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics research generates such a vast amount of data that making sense of this research now requires server-based computing power far beyond what ordinary desktop PCs can offer. The large amounts of data collected also means that data can be lost and errors can be made. Additionally, many scientists agree that there is valuable data obscured in large datasets, with limited means of accessing it. Consequently, a specialist IT solution is required to manage this data efficiently and accurately. Using the correct technical expertise can ensure that researchers end up with reliable and precise findings, a necessity when managing data looking at diseases such as cancer and stem cell research.

Solution: Studying proteomics holds various challenges, one being the large, dynamic quantity of proteins that are identified during research. The ever-increasing data generated through mass spectrometry means that it is no longer feasible to have technicians manually sort information only using a PC. Instead, proteomics analysis requires a server-based solution and integrated hardware and software workflow to identify peptides and proteins and their post-translational modifications, and to quantify the samples.

To solve this problem, Sage N Research has launched an integrated platform that combines hardware and software to minimize data turnaround time and improve productivity. The platform will allow laboratory technicians to spend more time doing important research and less time operating and customizing equipment. The platform was developed from a detailed, thorough investigation into mass spectrometrybased proteomics research.

The importance of mass spectrometry- based proteomics in cancer research means that it is critical that data is not lost or undependable in any way. The integrated platform enables researchers to characterize and identify proteins in complex disease states, while being customizable to offer the best solutions for proteomics research into diseases like cancer and stem cell research. The server-class integrated IT solutions are able to address 80 percent of computing applications, with the remaining customization being achieved through scripting, making the process considerably faster.

In order for research teams to experience the most efficient and uncomplicated mass spectrometry data searches, a platform-based approach should be adapted. This encourages researchers to concentrate on the science side, with the proteomics IT experts handling the specialized backroom servers and integrated storage systems, ensuring that staff are utilized to their full potential. An increasing number of laboratories are discovering that they need to implement more sophisticated technologies into their processes, therefore it is expected that this will become the industry norm in proteomics research.

Specialized solutions that integrate hardware and software have already been developed by high-end proteomics product companies and offer a proteomics workflow that ensures safe storage and retrieval of proteomics data, effective back-up and recovery, and smoother data analysis. These breakthrough products allow laboratories to work with safer, more reliable data, a necessity in labs dealing with disease research.

For more information, please visit www.sagenresearch.com or e-mail info@SageNResearch.com

Categories: How it Works

Published In

Communicating Science Magazine Issue Cover
Communicating Science

Published: November 1, 2011

Cover Story

Communicating Science

The scientific community has historically taken a dim view of communications with nonscientific publics. No thanks, said scientists. What an imposition! Why bother? What good could possibly come from interrupting research, sticking our necks out and dumbing it down for non-scientific dunderheads, only to see them mismanage our findings?