2010 Laboratory Glassware Washer Product Survey Results

As part of our online Lab Products Survey series, we present the results from our recent survey on purchasing a lab glassware washer.

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Glassware washing machines are more than convenience appliances: They ensure consistent cleaning of critical labware, free up technician time for more value-added work, and provide assurance and validation in regulated industries. With the possible exception of organic chemistry labs, most labs today rely on washers.

Efficient cleaning is a function of cycle time, wash temperature, mechanical action, and cleaning agents. The ideal combination is high water throughput at relatively gentle spray pressure, sufficiently high temperature, a spray pattern that reaches the entire wash load, and selection of cleaning agents suitable for the task.

As part of our online Lab Products Survey series, we present here results from our recent survey on purchasing a lab glassware washer.

Number of lab glassware washers installed within labs:

Most widely-used lab glassware washer brands currently in labs:

The primary purpose for this product:

Types of lab glassware washers being used:

Lab glassware washer-related components being used:

Annual lab glassware washer supplies and accessories purchasing budget for items such as detergents, baskets and inserts:

Satisfaction with lab glassware washers being used:

Purchasing plans for a new or used lab glassware washer:

Reasons for purchasing a new or pre-owned lab glassware washer:

Budget range for a lab glassware washer purchase:

Factors/features in the decision-making process to buy a lab glassware washer, rated by importance:

Respondents' fields of work:

Total completed surveys: 197

If you would like to participate in our laboratory equipment purchasing surveys, please visit www.labmanager.com/surveys

See the most recent survey results

Categories: Surveys

Published In

Science & the Public Trust Magazine Issue Cover
Science & the Public Trust

Published: September 1, 2010

Cover Story

Science & The Public Trust

Scientific communication researchers see a change in the prevailing mode of scientific communicationthe top-down deficit model to one in which being engaged with the public at some level is just part of what it means to be a scientist.