Original Broadcast Date: Tuesday April 5, 2016

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In 2009, the National Research Council issued a critical report citing a lack of scientific research supporting some of the testing and opinions being offered in court, and lack of uniformity in the way forensic laboratories approached cases, potentially impacting the reliability of the work being done, and leading to cases being dismissed, or wrongful convictions. In 2014, the Organization of Scientific Area Committees in Forensic Science was established to address some of these deficiencies. The organization, now a year old, has begun to make progress in addressing some of the deficiencies and is developing a registry of standards that have been subject to a consensus driven, open, transparent process that allows for public and stakeholder input, and due process in adjudication of that input. The presentation will describe the origin of these changes, the structure of the OSAC organization, and the path forward for forensic science.

Learning Objectives:

  • Evaluate the criticisms of forensic science that demanded change
  • Contrast the operations of the former Scientific Working Group model with the new OSAC model
  • Describe the structure of the new organization and the roles of its constituent committees and subcommittees
  • Follow the process for the development of a standard through the process to it being placed on the NIST registry

Dr. Barry Logan is a Fellow of the American Board of Forensic Toxicologists and has over 100 publications in toxicology and analytical chemistry, including work on the effects of drugs and driving impairment, and cause and manner of death for a wide range of drugs and toxins. His recent work has focused on the analytical and interpretive toxicology of emerging recreational and designer drugs. His other appointments include Executive Director of the Robert F Borkenstein course at Indiana University, and academic appointments at Indiana University, Arcadia University, Thomas Jefferson University and Temple University, and he oversees a variety of research initiatives with academic institutions and medical examiners offices. Dr. Logan has received numerous awards including the AAFS Rola Harger Award, the ICADTS Widmark Award, the National Safety Council’s Robert F Borkenstein Award, and is a past President of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Webinar Sponsored By:

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Bruker
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