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Webinars: Webinar: Novel Ways to Monitor Cell Growth and Cytotoxicity: StainFree Technology and EarlyTox Cell Integrity Assay

Webinar Details
Webinar: Novel Ways to Monitor Cell Growth and Cytotoxicity: StainFree Technology and EarlyTox Cell Integrity Assay
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In this webinar, you will learn how you can perform cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, and other assays without fluorescent labels like DAPI or cell viability dyes on an imaging microplate reader.

Live Air Date: Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Imaging cell-based assays typically requires the use of fluorescent probes that can be toxic to living cells or may require fixation. A label-free method for analyzing cell counts and cell confluence enables researchers to quantitatively monitor cell proliferation and health without time-consuming workflows that may disrupt cell viability. The SpectraMax® i3 Multi-Mode Microplate Platform with MiniMax™ 300 Imaging Cytometer uses unique, patent-pending StainFree™ Cell Detection Technology so that users can perform cell proliferation, cytotoxicity, and other assays without fluorescent labels like DAPI or cell viability dyes.

During this webinar, you will learn how to:

  • Use StainFree™ Technology to count cells and estimate confluence without DAPI or other fluorescent dyes
  • Set up imaging assays quickly and easily with the intuitive SoftMax® Pro Software user interface
  • Perform multi-color cell viability studies with the EarlyTox™ Cell Integrity Kit

Speaker

Dr. Cathy Olsen has been an application scientist at Molecular Devices since 2004, where she is responsible for developing a broad range of applications for microplate-based detection systems, included cell-based, biochemical, and imaging applications. Cathy received her PhD in cell and developmental biology from the University of California, Davis. Her thesis work on the role of forkhead genes in ascidian development was published in several key developmental biology journals. Cathy’s postdoctoral research focused on how transformation affects normal growth processes of human mammary epithelial cells as well as the role of Hedgehog interacting protein (HIP) in Hedgehog pathway cell signaling.

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