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NIST

Do You Have What It Takes to be a Forensic Fingerprint Examiner?

by National Institute of Standards and Technology
With support from NIST, experts are developing tests to help identify people with the pattern-matching skills needed for analyzing fingerprints. Try your eye on a few of the questions by clicking on the link at the end of this article.

Digital Crime-Fighters Face Technical Challenges with Cloud Computing

by National Institute of Standards and Technology
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued for public review and comment a draft report summarizing 65 challenges that cloud computing poses to forensics investigators who uncover, gather, examine and interpret digital evidence to help solve crimes.

Snowballs to Soot: The Clumping Density of Many Things Seems to Be a Standard

by National Institute of Standards and Technology
Particles of soot floating through the air and comets hurtling through space have at least one thing in common: 0.36. That, reports a research group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), is the measure of how dense they will get under normal conditions, and it’s a value that seems to be constant for similar aggregates across an impressively wide size range from nanometers to tens of meters.*

Nearly Everyone Uses Piezoelectrics. Be Nice to Know How They Work.

by National Institute of Standards and Technology
Piezoelectrics—materials that can change mechanical stress to electricity and back again—are everywhere in modern life. Computer hard drives. Loud speakers. Medical ultrasound. Sonar. Though piezoelectrics are a widely used technology, there are major gaps in our understanding of how they work.

New NIST Tests Explore Safety of Nanotubes in Modern Plastics Over Time

by National Institute of Standards and Technology
Who cares about old plastic? Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) do, so that you won’t have to years down the road, when today’s plastic concoctions start to break down and disintegrate from weather exposure. Experiments* at NIST may help scientists devise better tests to make sure aging plastics won’t turn into environmental or health hazards as time goes by.

NIST Demonstrates How Losing Information Can Benefit Quantum Computing

by National Institute of Standards and Technology
Suggesting that quantum computers might benefit from losing some data, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have entangled—linked the quantum properties of—two ions by leaking judiciously chosen information to the environment.

NIST Ytterbium Atomic Clocks Set Record for Stability

by National Institute of Standards and Technology
A pair of experimental atomic clocks based on ytterbium atoms at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has set a new record for stability. The clocks act like 21st-century pendulums or metronomes that could swing back and forth with perfect timing for a period comparable to the age of the universe.