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Biotechnology Ranked the Happiest Career in America

Last month, Forbes reported that a survey conducted by CareerBliss.com revealed that biotechnology employees were the happiest in their jobs, out of dozens of other professions in the United States. These results suggest that paychecks aren't

by Katia Caporiccio
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Last month, Forbes reported that a survey conducted by CareerBliss.com revealed that biotechnology employees were the happiest in their jobs, out of dozens of other professions in the United States.

These results suggest that paychecks aren't the only things that provide job satisfaction, but several other criteria, the most important of which are as follows:

  • the specific tasks the employees perform daily
  • the level of control an employee has over his or her work
  • relationships with co-workers, supervisors and customers

Clearly money isn't enough to keep employees happy at work. As Lab Manager Magazine's Fourth Annual Salary and Employee Satisfaction Survey (October 2010) revealed, "the majority of those working in the scientific research field enjoy what they do and share a sense of purpose and a commitment to their work and organizations."

The study conducted by CareerBliss—which surveyed 200,000 employees in 70,000 professions across the country—revealed that biotechnology workers were the happiest with their daily tasks, and the level of control they felt they had over those tasks, and were happy with their co-workers and supervisors/managers.

CareerBliss' study suggests that money doesn't buy love—especially when it comes to your job. A sense of accomplishment, good relationships and meaningful work all contribute to a happy employee.