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HYPERION II—Noise-Limited and Signal-Limited Environments

Bruker's HYPERION II ensures stability and coverage over the spectral range

Bruker HYPERION image

Bruker's HYPERION II ensures stability and coverage over the spectral range

by Bruker Corporation
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Q:One of the major issues in spectroscopy is that you’re always limited to work in one of two different regimes: noise-limited or signal-limited.

In a noise-limited regime, the molecules are all illuminated, and you need to see the average to improve your detection limits.  Here, the noise of the detector and the system in general is crucial; the sensitivity for getting more photons isn’t important. 

In a signal-limited regime, you’re looking at potentially thick samples (in microfluidics, for example, where water is absorbing and impeding flow) and you need to “turn on the lights” with a longer pathlength. This requires a brighter source.

A:Bright sources tend to be narrow in spectral coverage. So, if you’re not in a signal Bright sources tend to be narrow in spectral coverage. So, if you’re not in a signal limited regime, why not use a glowbar? It has low noise, with noise being further reduced by averaging and has excellent spectral coverage.

When working to incorporate bright sources into a spectrometer, it is not easy to simultaneously ensure both stability and coverage over the spectral range and be cost-effective. With this most recent advancement and innovation, this is now possible.

To learn more, visit: www.bruker.com/HYPERION