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Meditation Could Be a Cheaper Alternative to Traditional Pain Medication

Results a recent study suggest that a single 10-minute mindfulness meditation session administered by a novice therapist can improve pain tolerance, pain threshold, and decrease anxiety towards pain

by Sarah Cardwell-Leeds Beckett University News Office
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Just ten minutes of mindfulness meditation could be used as an alternative to painkillers, according to research by Leeds Beckett University.

Results of the study suggest that a single 10-minute mindfulness meditation session administered by a novice therapist can improve pain tolerance, pain threshold, and decrease anxiety towards pain.

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The research was carried out by the School of Clinical and Applied Sciences at Leeds Beckett and used a group of 24 healthy university-aged students (12 men and 12 women). They were randomly split into a control group and a meditation group.

A cold-pressor task was used to cause pain to the participants; they put their hand in warm water for two minutes before removing it and placing it immediately into ice water for as long as they could manage and only removed it when the pain became too much and could no longer be tolerated. They then either sat quietly for 10 minutes (control group) or meditated for 10 minutes before repeating the cold-pressor task.

Related Article: Meditation May Mitigate Migraine Misery

Five groups of data were then collected; anxiety towards pain, pain threshold, pain tolerance, pain intensity, and pain unpleasantness. Pre-intervention the figures didn’t differ greatly between the control and meditation groups but following the 10-minute meditation session, the participants from the meditation group saw a significant decrease in anxiety towards pain and a significant increase in pain threshold and pain tolerance.

Speaking about the results of the study, Dr. Osama Tashani, senior research fellow in pain studies, said: “While further research is needed to explore this in a more clinical setting on chronic pain patients, these results do show that a brief mindfulness meditation intervention can be of benefit in pain relief. The ease of application and cost effectiveness of the mindfulness meditation may also make it a viable addition to the arsenal of therapies for pain management.

“The mindfulness mediation was led by a researcher who was a novice; so in theory clinicians could administer this with little training needed. It’s based on traditional Buddhist teachings which focuses attention and awareness on your breathing.”